Saturday, September 08, 2007

Math, with a side of humor

Thursday was Amy’s first day at school.* She’s taking English, history and math and, for the most part, I think she enjoyed it.

There are a few reasons we wanted her to take math at school. Anyone who knows me knows the main reason: I don’t do math. The second is the math teacher is wonderful! She is willing to help however she can and she makes the class fun.

She handed out the following on teaching math. If one of my math teachers had had a sense of humor I might have done better in the subject…

Teaching Math

1. Teaching Math In 1950s: A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price. What is his profit?

2. Teaching Math In 1960s: A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price, or $80. What is his profit?

3. Teaching Math In 1970s: A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is $80. Did he make a profit?

4. Teaching Math In 1980s: A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is $80 and, therefore, his profit is $20. Your assignment: Underline the number 20.

5. Teaching Math In 1990s: A logger cuts down a beautiful forest because he is selfish and inconsiderate and cares nothing for the habitat of animals or the preservation of our woodlands. He does this so he can make a profit of $20. What do you think of this way of making a living? Topic for class participation after answering the question: How did the birds and squirrels feel as the logger was cutting down their homes? (Note: There are no wrong answers.)

6. Teaching Math In 2006: Un hachero vende una carretada de madera para $100. El costo de la producciones es $80. Es verdad. Muchas gracias.
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*Yes, we're still homeschooling, but the kids go to a school for homeschoolers once a week. Michael's taking history, English and drama, and Rebecca will be taught all the subjects except math. Sean likes to call it "hybrid homeschooling." The school has hired teachers who pick the curriculum and write the lesson plans. Then I follow through during the rest of the week on what the teachers assign. It’s the best of both worlds if you ask me.